Food Industry Jobs: How To Prevent Your Competitor From Stealing Your Talent?

//Food Industry Jobs: How To Prevent Your Competitor From Stealing Your Talent?

Food Industry Jobs: How To Prevent Your Competitor From Stealing Your Talent?

Not long ago, several engineers brought a suit against Apple, Google, Intel, Pixar and other top companies citing a secret no-poaching agreement between them. The deal, they claimed, prevented employees from seeking better opportunities. Apparently, the companies have now agreed on a $415 million dollar settlement to prevent a potentially embarrassing trial.

Stealing talented workers isn’t new, but we are no longer in an age where employees can be forced to stay with you- especially when discussing jobs in the food industry. There are better ways to prevent employees from jumping ship. Here’s how to keep your competitors from raiding your employees:

Create the right environment at work:

When employees quit, it is not always about the money. There are several other issues- the work environment being one of them. I have heard stories about bosses bitching about one employee to the other, and employers demeaning their staff in public. Naturally, this creates an environment of distrust and one-upmanship.

Tighten the hiring process:

Talented food industry professionals can afford to be picky. Employing the right candidate is a proactive approach to prevent poaching. Look for subtle signs to understand if the candidate is suited for your work culture- if not, it’s best to let him go. Create a time window to respond to candidates and offer feedback if possible. And if you think the candidate is talented enough to be pursued by other competitors, try selling him the benefits of working with you. And most important of all, make them feel good about themselves.

Is the employee worth a counteroffer?

Naturally, you cannot always prevent talented employees from leaving you. In such instances, ask if the staff is worth keeping. Ask yourself the three questions to decide if the employee is worthy of a counteroffer.

By | 2016-05-24T08:42:54+00:00 May 24th, 2016|Staffing and Recruiting|0 Comments

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